SPLISS Newsletters

SPLISS infographic

The SPLISS 2.0 project compared elite sport policy in 15 nations across nine Pillars: (1) financial support; (2) organisation and structure of elite sport policies; (3) sports participation; (4) talent identification and development; (5) athletic career support; (6) Sport facilities; (7) coach provision and development; (8) national and international competition; (9) Scientific research and innovation. This extensive research project is a collaboration of 53 researchers and 33 policy partners worldwide, and involves over 3,000 high performance athletes, 1,300 coaches and more than 240 Performance directors. Click: SPLISS infographic

 

How did the 15 SPLISS nations do in Rio 2016?

The objective of the SPLISS project is to better understand which sport policies lead to international sporting success (and how), and to obtain further insight into the effectiveness and efficiency of elite sport policies of nations at an overall sports level. How did the 15 nations perform in Rio and how does that relate to their policies? Click: How did the 15 SPLISS nations do in Rio?

 

SPLISS evaluation Brazil (Rio 2016) and Japan (Tokyo 2020)

This newsletter is concerned with the evaluation of elite sport policies of Brazil (Rio 2016) and Japan (Tokyo 2020) in the SPLISS 2.0 project (Sports Policy factors Leading to International Sporting Success. Click: How does Brazil stack up?

 

SPLISS factsheet: efficient nations are better organised

One major finding that came out of the SPLISS 2.0 study is the clear relationship between the organization and structure of nations and their efficiency in terms of return on investment. Precisely those countries that were identified as being the most efficient (Australia, Japan, France and the Netherlands for summer sports; Canada, the Netherlands, and Switzerland for winter sports), are also the countries that perform best on Pillar 2: “organisation, governance & structure of elite sport”. Click: Efficient nations are better organised

 

Extended abstract book SPLISS 2.0

This book deals with the strategic policy planning process that underpins the development of successful national elite sport development systems. Complementary to existing literature, this research aims to examine the interaction between policy-inputs (financial resources), policy-throughputs (processes) and outputs (results during international competitions, e.g., medals, medal points, number of elite athletes qualifying, etc.) in elite sport more closely. Drawing on a theoretical framework of nine Pillars, it aims to understand which (and how) sport policies lead to international sporting success and to obtain a better insight into the effectiveness and efficiency of elite sport policies of nations at an overall sports level. The article is based on the SPLISS (Sports Policy factors Leading to International Sporting Success) 2.0 project, involving 15 distinct nations in collaboration with 58 researchers and 33 policy makers who collected data and on surveys with 3142 elite athletes, 1376 high performance coaches and 243 performance directors. Click: Extended abstract SPLISS 2.0

 

Book review of Popi Sotiriadou 

“Overall, this is a much needed book for a great host of individuals, organisations and nations! It will keep its readers engaged and informed at all times. This book achieves it aims as it advances both academic knowledge and contributes to effective elite sport policies for practitioners, offers a mix of theoretical and practical insights and develops an instrument that can be used by policymakers and academics alike to evaluate the effectiveness of elite sport policies. It is a must have book in your personal, organisational or faculty library!” Click: SPLISS 2.0 Book review Sotiriadou

 

Book release SPLISS 2.0

Key questions about high performance sport policy? Why do some countries win more medals than others? How much do countries invest in elite sport? How can policy makers influence the success of their athletes? What makes an elite sport policy effective and efficient? How should we measure success? How do nations prioritize their elite sport investment decisions? What is the impact of success in international sports events on society as a whole? Click: Book release SPLISS 2.0

 

Welcome to SPLISS Congress 2015

The book of abstracts from the World Congress on Elite Sport Policy, brought to you by the SPLISS Consortium and ISEAL, Victoria University’s Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living. Click: SPLISS Congress 2015 Book of Abstracts

 

A teaser regarding the new SPLISS Book!

Click: Teaser SPLISS 2.0 Book Successful elite sport policies

 

First SPLISS Conference on Elite Sport Success: society boost or not?

Why do some countries win more medals than others? How much do countries invest in elite sport? How can policy makers influence the success of their athletes? What makes an elite sport policy effective and efficient? How should we measure success? How do nations prioritize their elite sport investment decisions? What is the impact of success in international sports events on society as a whole? How can nations improve their medal count?

These key questions about high performance sport policy will be answered at the first SPLISS Conference on Elite Sport Success: society boost or not? This conference takes place on Wednesday 13 & Thursday 14 November 2013 in Antwerp (Belgium), the European Capital of Sport for 2013. Almost 300 participants from all over the world will be attending this conference (including delgates from Brazil, the United States, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and many European countries). Click: Is winning medals in international sport simply a matter of money?

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